Important Information

When will my roses be delivered?

You can order your roses at any time to reserve your stock.  Once you order is received we will dispatch your roses from mid-June to the end of August.  All orders will be dispatched in order of receipt (no exceptions will be made).  So the sooner you get your order in the sooner your roses will be dispatched.

Bulk Discounts (Perennials)?

Purchase 5 or more perennials and receive a discounts ranging from 5% – 15%.  Discounts are automatically applied when 5 or more perennials are in your shopping basket.

How do I earn Mistydowns Reward Points?

You will automatically earn 1 point for every $2.00 you spend on mistydowns.com.au. These points will be credited to your account when your order ships.

How do I use my Mistydowns Reward Points?

If you earned points from a previous order you will be given the opportunity to redeem these points on your next order. Simply follow the instructions at the top of the cart page to redeem your points.

If you don’t have a points balance you will not see any information on the cart page.

How many Reward Points can I redeem at once?

You can redeem points up to the value of $25 (500 points) on any one order. Points cannot be redeemed for shipping costs.

Will my Reward Points expire?

Mistydowns Reward Points are valid for 1 year from the time they are earned.  If your points are not redeemed within 1 year they will automatically be removed from your account.

Can I order Roses and Perennials together?

Roses and Perennials can be ordered together. Please note mixed orders may be delayed by up to 4 – 6 weeks in shipping during the bare-rooted roses season. Due to mixed orders being sent together in batches as packing methods are not similar to just bare-rooted roses.

Can I order Roses and Peonies together?

Roses and Peonies can be ordered together as shipping methods are compatible for safe transit.

Rose Information

What is ‘Black Spot’?

Black Spot is a fungus found on the rose leaves. Black Spot will not kill a rose but certainly detracts from its appearance. It is easily treated with a fungicide. Many brands are available on the Nursery shelves and if used as recommended should bring under control, However, a well fed and watered rose with full sun and good air flow is less susceptible to Black Spot and Mildew out outbreaks.

What is Mildew? How do you treat it?

Mildew is another form of fungus and requires immediate attention as if left unchecked it may prove fatal to the rose. It forms a white film on the leaves, stems and flower buds that completely covers the surface, in fact it tends to suffocate the rose, Treatment with a recommended fungicide on a regular basis when outbreaks occur will bring it under control. Conditions similar to black spot treatment of adequate food, water, air flow and sun light play a big factor in the prevention of Mildew.

Should you plant the graft below or above the soil surface?

It is personal choice really? The root system of the understock is certainly adequate to support the growth of its host. However, in very extreme cold conditions not usually experienced in Australia plants are planted with their graft below the surface so as the grafted plant may self root and re-shoot from the submerged crown if frost bite or freezing occurs. It is not recommended for those roses that have a stoloniferis habit sucker easily. (Gallica’s, Rugosa and some Species roses etc.)Some of these roses very quickly put out stolen like growth below the surface and pop up to form a thicket that is often not desired in a domestic garden. However by planting these particular roses with their bud union or graft above the surface they make excellent garden specimens.

What is the difference between Modern and Old Fashioned Roses?

Modern Roses are those that have been bred in the last 100-150 years. Old Fashioned or Heritage Roses are those that were bred or found prior to this time. Man has enjoyed the beauty and medicinal qualities of the rose since known recorded time began.

Why do some roses ‘Ball’?

Balling is not a disease or virus it is merely the effect of the weather conditions on newly opening roses, Roses with large numbers of petals are much slower to open and are often (in Spring particularly) caught with rain, wind and humidity , making the outside petals become damaged and brown. They stick together making a cocoon that the inner petals cannot evolve from. Mildew forms and they rot and fall off. This is called ‘Balling’.